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Report From PIA – September 18

I think that most people who love to garden are optimistic. We are willing to stick tiny seeds in the soil and assume that they’ll sprout. Gardeners expect every plant that is put into the ground will live and grow. The sweet thing is that we continue to trust in this life and growth, even when things die. And as all gardeners know, they do die.

Every growing season I take all of the labels from the plants I’ve put into the ground and toss them in a jar. Sometime during the following winter, I’ll enter these plants on my master list in the computer. Whenever I go back to this file, and scroll though the list of plant names, I’m always amazed at how many of these plants are dead. I see names of plants that I’ve forgotten were ever placed in my gardens!

Fortunately, I take an optimistic approach to ideas and projects. I want to grow that, I’ll think, and I’ll send out query letters, write proposals, or take photographs. Some of these projects germinate, and many do not. Frankly, I have a better track record with plants than I do with book proposals.

Yet I’m always optimistic, and I’m better off for it. It’s exciting to anticipate the growth of something new. Even if what I wish for doesn’t come true, I am moving forward, creating, knowing for sure that if I don’t plant the seeds, nothing will grow.

Hope and faith are life-sustaining.

I planted a lovely Lawson Blue cypress where it got hot afternoon sun.  It fried and died.

I planted a lovely Lawson Blue cypress where it got hot afternoon sun. It fried and died.

I have no idea what happened to this rhododendron...

I have no idea what happened to this rhododendron...

But this 'Pinot Gris' Heuchera - all 9 of them - thrive and have bloomed all summer.

But this 'Pinot Gris' Heuchera - all 9 of them - thrive and have bloomed all summer.

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